Schedule of Events and Registration Information

On this page, a graphic schedule is available as well as descriptions of each presentation or demonstration. Please review the available sessions and decide which ones you would like to attend before clicking the registration link.

NEW Friday Schedule


Eventbrite Registration Link: REGISTER HERE!

Please note that if you are under 18 years of age, you MUST have a parent sign a waiver for you. Waivers will be available at the registration table for parents to sign, but if you are under 18 years of age and are coming without your parent or legal guardian, you must print out the attached waiver, have your parent or guardian sign it, and bring it with you to turn in when you check-in or you will NOT be allowed to participate.

Waivers will be available to sign at check in for all attendees, but feel free to print out the attached waiver and sign it beforehand to help us make registration move faster. We can’t wait to see you there!

Click the link below for a printable PDF waiver.
PRINTABLE MEDICAL WAIVER


Event Timeline with Session Descriptions

Friday

Check-in will begin at 8:00 am and poster presentations will be available for viewing from 8:00 am – 10:10 am.

 

Friday World FitWalk and Indoor Relay

When: Friday at 9:10 am – 10:20 am

Session Type: Experience

Description: Group activity (walk) to promote health and fitness- available and accessible to all!

 

Poster Presentations

When: Friday at 8:00 am – 10:10 am

Session Type: Come and Go Walkthrough Presentations

Description: At this come and go event, presenters from different organizations, groups, and classes will present their research information and share their knowledge and experiences.

 

Keynote Speaker- Kurt Podeszwa

When: Friday at 10:20 am – 11:10 am

Session Type: Keynote Address

Description: Keynote Session entitled: “Titled: “The Language of Adaptation: How Words Affect Our Actions.” The Inuit people have 50 words for what we call snow. That level of specificity means that they not only speak about snow differently than us, they also think about it differently. Our language forms how we think, and how we think affects our actions. This session will focus on how we think about active, adaptive, and ability. Kurt will focus on the internal and external language we use for adapting actives and for those with disabilities….or different abilities. Using his unique style of combining, video, lecture, small group and discussion. Kurt will lead participants on a journey of discovering how they think about adaptation and give them additional words to expand their thought process.

Disabilities and the Olympics by the United States Olympic Committee

When: Friday at 11:30 am – 12:20 pm

Session Type: Academic or Scholarly Presentation

Description: Part of maximizing growth in sport is recognize our own potential biases and how they could undermine productivity and cohesiveness in the world of athletics. Learn how the lack of awareness about our viewpoints, combined with cultural differences, affects how we view the world and treat others. See how diversity and inclusion affect sports with a particular focus on the Paralympic movement.

 

Learning from Women with Disabilities in Korea: A Fulbright Experience by Debbie Engelen-Eigles

When: Friday at 12:40 pm – 1:30 pm

Session Type: Academic or Scholarly Presentation

Description: In 2011-2012, Debbie Engelen-Eigles received a Fulbright Senior Scholar Research Award to Seoul, Korea, to study the experiences of women with disabilities in accessing health care. Affiliated with Seoul National University, her work allowed her to do one of the things she most enjoys as a sociologist—conducting in-depth interviews that allow her to make deep connections with others and step (if only briefly) into their lifeworlds. On the basis of her research, Debbie presented recommendations to policymakers, advocacy organizations, and the media for measures to improve health care access. In this presentation, Debbie will address cultural issues of disability in Korean society, findings from her research, self-advocacy and social change, and the personal and professional impacts of her work as a Fulbright Scholar in Seoul. She will also provide information on the range of opportunities offered by Fulbright for intercultural exchange and next steps for those who would like to explore the process further or consider applying.

 

Adaptive Tennis Center and Programs by Josephine Sullivan

When: Friday at 12:40 pm – 1:30 pm

Session Type: Experience

Description: The Foundation is working with the United States Tennis Association and has received both a project number and identified representative to collaborate on the design and implementation of this facility. The Christina Grillo Sullivan Foundation is bring the first Adaptive USTA approved Tennis Center to Galveston Island. The Center will be comprised of six indoor (one indoor court with be a multi use court for Paralympics sports) courts and twelve outdoor courts, including kinesiology practicum facility, locker rooms, a pro-shop, parking, and multi-use space. The Christina Grillo Sullivan Foundation has brought to Galveston & surrounding Gulf Coast areas a Nationwide Adaptive Tennis Program. TCGSF has partnered with Galveston Independent School District, United States Tennis Association (USTA) and Special Olympics Texas (SOTX) to create a year round adaptive tennis program. Adaptive Tennis is a powerful tool for increasing the physical and emotional health of children and adults ages 8-22 years of age with intellectual and physical challenges, while simultaneously creating an essential support network among the athletes, their families, community and inclusion for all. The adaptive tennis program started in October 2017 for all SOTX/GISD Students. TCGSF has recently implemented the 22 to 80+ years young Adaptive Tennis Program working with the residence at Tideway in Galveston, Sunshine Center and soon with surrounding Gulf Coast area Wounded Warriors, disabled veterans, down syndrome, strokes, autisms, cerebral palsy to name a few. Summer Camps & Family Fun! Sign-ups already underway for children and adults with intellectually and physically challenges to bring a member(s) of their families’, so the experience includes siblings, mother, father, aunts and uncle’s: inclusion, FUN FOR ALL . Welcome to CAMP POSSIBILITIES!

 

Maximizing Participation for All by Chad Nelson

When: Friday at 12:40 pm – 1:30 pm

Session Type: Experience

Description: Camp AOK, Camp For All, Deerfoot Youth Camp, Camp Lonehollow, Camp Stewart and many others have provided me with valuable knowledge in regards to camp programming. I have had the opportunity to study and create programs that would accommodate youth of all physical abilities. Managing volunteers, I preface all activities with the mindset of having maximum participation for ALL campers. Regardless of the perception that an illness or disability may have on a camper, we cannot assume that all campers have extreme limitations. Each camper deserves the chance to participate in camp activities. I am excited to share my experiences of how to adapt traditional camp activities to fit the needs of campers who require a different challenge.

 

Exploring the Dangers (or Benefits) of Language and its Effect on the Perception of Disabled Individuals by Alex Ramos

When: Friday at 12:40 pm – 1:30 pm

Session Type: Academic or Scholarly Presentation

Description: One of the biggest barriers to integrating disabled people into a society of non-disabled people is language. The choice of words we use to describe people who are “disabled” is incredibly important, especially for those at a young age. I would like to illustrate how, given the common definition of disabled, we are all in fact disabled. If the conversation around disabilities were to change, the perception and treatment of a disabled person would change with it. Maintaining a positive and motivated personality as a disabled person, and anyone for that matter, is incredibly important and can be significantly impacted by language.

 

Yoga for All by Bob Byrns

When: 12:40 pm – 1:30 pm

Session Type: Experience

Description: Chair Yoga for All Experience

 

Memory Care through Spice Painting and Improv! by Dr. Christine Tisone

When: Friday at 1:50 pm – 2:40 pm and Saturday at 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Session Type: Demonstration

Description: Although most forms of dementia and memory loss are not reversible, research has shown that certain memory care activities can slow down the progress of dementia and/or relieve accompanying symptoms, such as anxiety and withdrawal from conversation. Memory care activities involve the use of one or more of the human senses to stimulate brain activity. The olfactory sense is processed in a different region of the brain than input from the visual, hearing, and tactile senses, and is the focus of this experiential demonstration. After a brief introduction and presentation, participants will paint with scent-based water colors made from a variety of colorful spices and herbs, and practice the art of improvisational conversation based on their reactions to the various scents. Local assisted-living and memory care facilities will be invited to bring residents and staff to participate, but the overall goal is that anyone interested in memory care attend – including the general community – in order to spread awareness about simple activities that families and friends can conduct in order to benefit loved ones with dementia. (NOTE: We would like to conduct this demonstration on Friday AND on Saturday, in order to reach as many students, health care professionals, and community members as possible).

 

Settings for Living Out Able, Active, and Adpative: Parent Persepectives Panel by Dr. Marlene Dixon

When: Friday at 1:50 pm – 2:40 pm

Session Type: Discussion Panel

Description: Sports activity is significant to any child’s healthy physical and emotional development, and every young person with a disability should have an opportunity to participate in sport.” (American Association of Adapted Sports Programs Core Values, 2018). Parents with children who have a disability, often are frustrated with their child’s sport experience. In many areas, adaptive sport is not available in private or public settings, and/or parents are not aware of the options or resources that could broaden their child’s opportunities. In this session, parents will share their experiences in navigating their and their childs’ journey with adaptive sport, which includes experiences such as increasing awareness of adaptive sport, advocating activities, overcoming obstacles, and stories of both frustration and success. Panelists: Dr. Marlene Dixon, TAMU Sport Management (moderator)

Mr. Stuart Dixon, TAMU PEAP (panelist)
Mr. Doug Pils, TAMU Batallion Supervisor (panelist)
Mr. Douglas Garner, UT-Arlington, Assistant Director – Campus Recreation/Adapted Sports and Recreation (panelist)
Dr. Becky Garner, UT-Arlington, Director of Undergraduate Programs, Public Health

 

Aggie Disability Awareness (ADA) Workshop by Dr. Meagan Orsag

When: Friday at 1:50 pm 2:40 pm

Session type: Workshop

Description: Aggie Disability Awareness (ADA) Workshop is an interactive workshop designed to increase knowledge, awareness, and respect for people with disabilities among faculty and staff at Texas A&M University. The workshop is meant to promote strong dialogue about issues and information surrounding disability. All individuals are welcome to attend but attendance should never be mandated. In doing so, Aggie Disability Awareness will promote positive, equitable, accepting attitudes towards people with disabilities on campus.

 

Learning to Adapt Yoga for Individuals with Disabilities by Bob Byrns

When: 1:50 pm – 2:40 pm

Session Type: Workshop

Description: Learn to adapt yoga for individuals with disabilities.

 

Dyslexia Training: Promoting Success Among All Professionals by Elisa Beth McNeill and Megan Shipley

When: Friday at 3:00 pm – 3:50 pm

Session Type: Demonstration

Description: As youth, Thomas Edison, Ted Turner, and Charles Schwab had difficulty deciphering letters and numbers and were labeled “stupid,” yet, they were bright enough to invent the light bulb, revolutionize television news, and establish a substantial brokerage firm. Now we know their problem was dyslexia, not stupidity. Dyslexia is extremely common, affecting one in five people and representing 80–90 percent of all learning disabilities. Dyslexia, a neurological condition with a genetic basis, occurs when an individual has an unexpected difficulty with speed and accuracy of decoding (Siegel, 2006). Although  a dyslexic manifests itself in a variety of ways, individuals with dyslexia tend to have strengths in higher level thinking processes, learning capacity, creative problem-solving, thinking ‘outside the square’ and empathy. Dyslexics often excel when focused on highly specialized areas, ranging from medicine and law to science and architecture. A variety of adaptations are available to employers and colleagues to help dyslexic individuals succeed in school and in the workplace. In this presentation, participants will be led by a team of Health Education Specialists and Health and Kinesiology teacher certification candidates through four stations to learn a variety of strategies to support the adult dyslexic professional.

 

Creating Digital Content that “Just Works” by Kyle Boatsman

When: Friday at 3:00 pm – 3:50 pm

Session Type: Workshop or Training

Description: We’re all producing an extraordinary amount of digital content – from Word documents to websites – but are we building it to work for everyone? By learning a few key principles, you’ll know how to make your content easier for everyone to access and understand.

 

What is Occupational Therapy? by Julie Thompson

When: Friday at 3:00 pm – 3:50 pm

Session Type: Experience

Description: Occupational therapy is an often misunderstood resource that can help people throughout the lifespan increase participation, function and independence with their daily occupations and roles. Occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants work in a variety of settings including early intervention, schools, homes, outpatient clinics, rehabilitation settings, hospitals, mental health settings, and in the community. This experience will include hands-on participation with different adaptive devices and techniques occupational therapists use to help people with disabilities function as independently as possible, as well as educate the community about occupational therapy.

 

Utilizing Differentiated Instruction Activities to Optimize Students’ Academic Performance: Training Pre-service Professionals by Caitlin Ballard

When: Friday at 3:00 pm – 3:50 pm

Session Type: Workshop or Training

Description: Background- Training pre-service professionals in differentiated instruction is crucial in creating quality, attentive, and inclusive professionals. It is imperative that these individuals are equipped with the knowledge and skills needed to develop modifications to increase students’ academic success. Utilizing a variety of differentiated instruction, we can provide students with the opportunity to thrive in and outside of the classroom. Methods: Students are more diverse now than they ever have been, resulting in diverse learning styles, disabilities, and needs. This session provides eight different stations using creative, hands on examples of instruction modifications with relevant rationales. Pre-service educators will help facilitate this session by incorporating their competence in differentiated instruction. This activity will encourage participants to work through a variety of stations identifying unique differentiated instruction strategies to incorporate in their own work or classroom. Conclusion: By training pre-service professionals in differentiated instruction, we can increase teacher self-efficacy in stepping in to help support students who are struggling. The integration of activities like the stations is vital in establishing inclusive methodology, ensuring all students thrive academically, and fostering a sense of community among students and teachers. Ultimately, students will have all of the resources and instructional modifications needed to meet their academic potential. This environment creates a safe learning atmosphere where all students can be healthy and academically successful.

 

Moving Together: A Collaboration to Develop Communication Skills between Postsecondary Students with Disabilities and Future Dance Educators by Alexandra Pooley and Courtney Kalaher

When: Friday at 3:00 pm – 3:50 pm

Session Type: Demonstration

Description: The Postsecondary Access and Training in Human Services (PATHS) program offered at the Center on Disability and Development at Texas A&M University prepares students with and without disabilities for a career serving people with disabilities, older adults, and children to live in their communities. How can a movement class impact such a program? As dance educators, we advocate for dance in education because it largely contributes to developing a meaningful educational experience for all students, including individuals with disabilities. Recognition and understanding of emotion, nonverbal cues, and social norms regarding personal and shared space significantly impacts a person’s ability to live a more purposeful life The course is called Communication Through Movement and seeks to reinforce social norms in professional settings pertaining to body language and personal space; promotes self advocacy, health and wellness; facilitates collaboration and problem solving skills; and empowers students with confidence to seek out, obtain, and sustain employment beyond the program. Our goal is to systematically integrate the concepts of communication while empowering the individual to develop his or her full capabilities in a structured yet explorative environment. During the demonstration we will share how we incorporated this course into an existing program, utilized student feedback to continue to build and develop the curriculum, and how we are collaborating with the dance department and future dance educators to continue a meaningful education for students with disabilities beyond high school.

 

There’s an App for That: Making the World More Accessible using Tech by Justin Romack

When: Friday 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Session Type: Demonstration

Description: I remember opening my eyes one April morning in 2008. Though sunshine streamed through my window, I saw nothing but pitch darkness. After 22 years and 90 eye surgeries, I was totally blind. How would I stay active? Would I be able to finish college? And, even if I did, could I get a job? How would I be a good husband? A father? Questions, anxieties and fears flooded my mind. The answer: There’s an app for that. In this session, we’ll explore common technologies that have empowered me to live bolder, engage deeper and make the often inaccessible world around me wonderfully accessible.

 

Disability Services in the College Environment by Tracey Forman

When: Friday at 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Session Type: Workshop or Training

Description: Disability Services in the College Environment. An overview of Disability Services in the college environment with a focus on how Disability Services offices facilitate accommodations; remove barriers and promote inclusion for students with mobility, physical and health-related disabilities that may affect their access and participation.

 

Preparing to Advocate for your Program by Doug Garner

When: Friday at 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Session Type: Academic or Scholarly Presentation

Description: Lessons from 26 years of Program Advocacy Abstract Adapted Sports and recreation programming is a relatively new field in exploring ‘inclusion’ and ‘transition’ for people with disabilities. Community programs and schools are immersed in navigating the waters of ‘what do we need to do?, ‘what are the mandates on providing these services?’; ‘who is our client’?; ‘what are the differences between Recreation vs. Sport programs?’; ‘where are we going?’ and ‘how do we get there from here?’ Coach Doug Garner, Assistant Director of Campus Recreation for Adapted Sports and Recreation at the University of Texas at Arlington and Head Coach of the National Champion Movin’ Mavs Intercollegiate Wheelchair Basketball Team will take participants on a 30 year ‘disability discovery’ journey. From his experiences as a father of a child with a disability in the 80’s to starting a Junior Wheelchair Sports program in Arkansas to work in Elite and High Performance Adapted Sports, Coach Garner will give insight into the sometimes sad and often humorous rules, roads, obstacles, perceived obstacles and experiences he has navigated in working in the Adapted Sport world. With this context in mind, all participants can gain an understanding of not only where have we been, but where are we going in providing programs and experiences that will help people with disabilities transition into current and future independent lives and reaching their full potential as human beings.

 

Developing Intercollegiate Sport; Models and Strategies of Successful Programs by Dr. Michael Cottingham

When: Friday at 4:00 pm – 5:00 pm

Session Type: Academic or Scholarly Presentation

Description: Research shows that people perceive disability as, at best, a sad limitation that should be fixed (Brisenden, 1998) and, at worst, a condition that should be ostracized (Rugoho & Maphosa, 2016). In contrast, athletes without disabilities are often worshiped as heroes and admired, their actions often mimicked from consumption behavior to social movements (Stevens, Lathrop, & Bradish, 2003). Athletes with disabilities hold a different and unique position; they are the most commonly presented visuals of people with disabilities (Hardin & Hardin, 2003), but their presentations are inappropriate at times with a focus on inspiration rather than performance (Goggin & Newel, 2000). This being said, there is emerging research on how athletes with disabilities are perceived by society and how this impacts their ability to garner support. This presentation will review what we know about how athletes with disabilities are seen and how these views impact people with disabilities.

 

Beep Baseball

When: 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Session Type: Experience

Description: Attendees will have the opportunity to learn about and play beep baseball, an adapted form of baseball for the visually impaired.

 

Wheelchair Basketball

When: 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Session Type: Experience

Description: Attendees will have the opportunity to learn about and play wheelchair basketball.

 

Wheelchair Rugby

When: 5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Session Type: Experience

Description: Attendees will have the opportunity to learn about and play wheelchair rugby.

 

Sitting Volleyball Demo Game

When: 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Session Type: Experience

Description: Attendees will have the opportunity to watch a sitting volleyball game.

 

Wheelchair Basketball

When: 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Session Type: Experience

Description: Attendees will have the opportunity to learn about and play wheelchair basketball.

 

Wheelchair Rugby

When: 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Session Type: Experience

Description: Attendees will have the opportunity to learn about and play wheelchair rugby.

 

Sitting Volleyball

When: 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Session Type: Experience

Description: Attendees will have the opportunity to participate in a sitting volleyball game.

 

Beep Baseball

When: 7:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Session Type: Experience

Description: Attendees will have the opportunity to learn about and play beep baseball, an adapted form of baseball for the visually impaired.

 

 

Saturday

*NOTE* Due to unforeseen circumstances, Saturday events have been cancelled and some events are being moved to Friday. Please view graphic schedule at top of page for the updated Friday schedule.

 

Registration will begin at 8:00 am.

 

Saturday World FitWalk

When: Friday at 9:00 am – 10:00 am

Session Type: Experience

Description: Group activity (walk) to promote health and fitness- available and accessible to all!

 

“I Wasn’t Going to be Carried” by Norah Schwartz

When: Saturday at 9:00 am – 10:00 am

Session Type: Academic or Scholarly Presentation

Description: “I Wasn’t Going to be Carried”: A Journey to the Top of the World Personifying the affirmation model developed by Swain and French (2000), adaptive athletes provide a counterexample to the medical and social models of disability that classify individuals with disabilities as ‘being less inclined to participate in physical activity and having little access to the sporting world’. Over the span of a few decades, adaptive athletes have turned these models upside down and a number have proven themselves to be high ranking competators. In this presentation, we examine the origins and history of the disability rights and adaptive athletes movements. This journey takes us from the basement of the Willowbrook Institution to the top of Mt. Everest, which blind mountaineer Eric Weihenmayer summited in 2001. We explore perceptions of dis/ability and athleticism, as well as resiliency and motivation among world class athletes, such as Rick Hoyt, Mark Wellman, Melanie Benn, who have completed over 1000 marathons, climbed El Capitan and won gold medals in Paralympic swimming — as well as lesser known athletes who are newer to the world of adaptive athletics.

 

Camp for All 2U by Jacob Garcia

When: Saturday at 9:00 am – 10:00 am

Session Type: Demonstration

Description: For the past 25 years Camp For All has empowered children, adults, and their families with challenging illnesses and disabilities to discover life. By partnering with over 60 non-profit organizations, Camp For All serves over 11,000 campers annually! At Camp For All in Burton, Texas campers are not defined by what they cannot do, but rather, what they can do. In the summer of 2014, Camp For All went beyond their gates and delivered the camper “can do” attitude to MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston, Texas. That summer the Camp For All 2U program was born. The Camp For All 2U program brings the camps traditional, barrier free activities on the road, to children in the hospital. Two full size canoes attached to furniture dollies, fishing from a balcony, and serving up smores are just a few things in this camp package. Monday through Friday, from 10:00 a.m. and 3:00 p.m., inpatients, outpatients, and their siblings between the ages of 5 and 18 are placed into “cabins”, or traveling groups, and is lead through a typical day of camp by a professionally trained cabin counselor. They are no longer “patients”, or a “sibling of a brother or sister with cancer”, but rather campers that get to experience cabin camaraderie, a feeling of choice, self expression, relief, and a renewed participation in life. In 2017 the Camp For All 2U program will have grown from one hospital, one week, one city, and seventy five campers – to five hospitals, one bereavement facility, seven weeks, two cities and over four hundred campers. ”

 

Keynote Session: Legacy by Paralympian Kari Miller

When: Saturday at 10:00 am – 11:00 am

Session Type: Keynote Address

Description: Through my journey, I plan to share the spirit of resiliance and legacy with those in attendance.

 

The Language of Adaptation: How Words Affect our Actions by Kurt Podeszwa

Session type: Workshop/training

When: Saturday at 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Description: The Inuit people have 50 words for what we call snow. That level of specificity means that they not only speak about snow differently than us, they also think about it differently. Our language forms how we think, and how we think affects our actions. This session will focus on how we think about active, adaptive, and ability. Kurt will focus on the internal and external language we use for adapting actives and for those with disabilities….or different abilities. Using his unique style of combining, video, lecture, small group and discussion. Kurt will lead participants on a journey of discovering how they think about adaptation and give them additional words to expand their thought process.

 

Rolling Into the Unknown by Mary Beth Schubauer

When: Saturday 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Session Type: Presentation

Description: Research on the impact of training facility accessibility on the performance outcomes of athletes with physical disabilities is non-existent. The focus of my research is on the perspective of athletes who compete locally, regionally, and on a broader scale, and the impact that training facility accessibility has on their individualized performance outcomes. I endeavor to discover barriers and facilitators that training facilities present to these athletes as the issue of full access to appropriate training facilities is a problem that needs to be addressed to provide equitable treatment of athletes with physical disabilities in society.

 

How Inclusive is Texas A&M? Perspectives of Faculty and Students about Inclusion on Campus by Carly Gilson, Christina Gushanas, YiFan Li, and Kaitlin Foster

When: Saturday at 11:00 am – 12:00 pm

Session Type: Formal Research Presentation

Description: Inclusive postsecondary education (IPSE) programs for individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities (IDD) are increasingly prevalent nationally, more than 268 programs across 47 states (Think College, 2017). Most of these programs are certificate-based/non-degree, which students participate in limited campus activities and some inclusive courses (Grigal, Hart, Smith, Domin, & Sulewski, 2013). Trends have shifted to emphasize inclusion in all aspects of college life, rather than a subset of activities. Inclusion across education contexts is necessary to acknowledge and inspire the full potential of individuals with IDD. Thus, when considering how to “reaffirm diversity and inclusion” across a large university campus, peers and faculty are integral stakeholders to developing inclusive social and academic opportunities across campus. IPSE programs impact more than individuals with IDD. When this level of diversity is encouraged, it leads to a more tolerant, equitable and cohesive campus community (Banks & Polack, 2013; Bruder & Morgo-Wilson, 2010). Additionally, including individuals with IDD within all aspects of IPSE programs contributes to the overall campus creativity and morale (International Labour Organisation, 2010). We sought the perspectives of more than 1,300 faculty and students at a large, diverse public university that does not currently offer an IPSE program for individuals with IDD. We conducted an online survey and focus groups targeting undergraduate students, graduate students, and faculty. The survey addressed the following research questions: (1) How do faculty and students perceive the current level of inclusive opportunities on their campus? (2) How do faculty and students report their willingness to accept students with IDD on their campus? (3) What factors predict higher degrees of acceptance toward prospective students with IDD on their campus? Survey data collection will take place through December 2017 and focus groups will begin in January 2018. Our focus groups will allow us to deepen our understanding of perspectives across these critical stakeholders and identify barriers toward inclusion and brainstorm strategies to create more inclusive opportunities for individuals with IDD.

 

Developing Intercollegiate Sport; Models and Strategies of Successful Programs by Dr. Michael Cottingham

When: Friday at 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Session Type: Academic or Scholarly Presentation

Description: Currently there are approximately 21 universities with intercollegiate sports programs. Of these, only one program is housed and funded through athletics (Cottingham, Velasco, Vineyard, & Asias, 2015). These universities offer programming as diverse as goalball, wheelchair tennis, wheelchair rugby, wheelchair basketball, adaptive swimming, handcycling, wheelchair racing, and ambulatory adaptive racing. In addition, the organizational structures of these programs varies greatly with some programs being run by faculty, others graduate students, student organizations and/or staff. In addition, these programs acquire funding through different mechanisms; these include both institutional resources as well external funding sources. Finally, programs vary in how they define a student athlete and who is eligible to participate. This presentation will focus on models of program development and growth with emphasis on resource acquisition, athlete recruitment, and sport selection.

 

I am a Texas A&M Student with a Disability: Student Panel

When: Saturday at 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Session Type: Panel Discussion

Description: Discussion panel focused on life as a Texas A&M student with a disability.

 

Memory Care through Spice Painting and Improv! by Christine Tisone

When: Saturday at 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm

Session Type: Demonstration

Description: Although most forms of dementia and memory loss are not reversible, research has shown that certain memory care activities can slow down the progress of dementia and/or relieve accompanying symptoms, such as anxiety and withdrawal from conversation. Memory care activities involve the use of one or more of the human senses to stimulate brain activity. The olfactory sense is processed in a different region of the brain than input from the visual, hearing, and tactile senses, and is the focus of this experiential demonstration. After a brief introduction and presentation, participants will paint with scent-based water colors made from a variety of colorful spices and herbs, and practice the art of improvisational conversation based on their reactions to the various scents. Local assisted-living and memory care facilities will be invited to bring residents and staff to participate, but the overall goal is that anyone interested in memory care attend – including the general community – in order to spread awareness about simple activities that families and friends can conduct in order to benefit loved ones with dementia. (NOTE: We would like to conduct this demonstration on Friday AND on Saturday, in order to reach as many students, health care professionals, and community members as possible).

 

Chair Aerobics by Denise Chapman

When: Saturday at 1:00 pm – 2:00 pm

Session Type: Experience

Description: Chair exercise allows most individuals to complete some form of fitness while sitting or utilizing a chair for balance.  While not all exercises will be applicable to all individuals, I will show you how to incorporate fitness for a wide variety of participants.  This will be a fully interactive session.  Proper body alignment is a major key within any movement class.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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